All posts by Lucy

Lucy Cota is senior researcher and staff writer at Movies on Chatham. A native of Atlanta, she is a graduate of The University of Georgia, an avid reader and highly-skilled researcher, attributes that strongly support her position and contributions. We all run a little faster to keep pace with Lucy!

Metalious’s Peyton Place shatters illusions of 1950s

Through the decades of the 1940s and 1950s in America, societal monotony with its binary vision and easy moral choices began to change into a complex and uncomfortable nation of people, thanks in part to a revolutionary foray into areas of literary taboo in movies and in books such as Grace Metalious’s Peyton Place.

In the early 1940s, America needed women in the workforce, with her men overseas fighting Nazi and Fascist regimes. Continue reading Metalious’s Peyton Place shatters illusions of 1950s

Celebrity protest: Gasland or La La Land?

Though there are many concerns among groups in the US regarding hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”), the opinions of some groups are quite polarized and more glaring than others. This article suggests consideration for perspectives not often heard in the ads and news items—those of local landowners and others most affected by the decisions to keep or curtail gas drilling operations. The most publicized are the perspectives of celebrities and others who have the wealth to support media advertising and film production. Continue reading Celebrity protest: Gasland or La La Land?

Gasland: Russia and Others Promote the Runaway Bandwagon

When settling down to watch a documentary film, I remind myself of two important things:

  1. Rarely does a documentary film tell the whole story.
  2. People believe what they want to believe.1

It was with this mindset that I watched Gasland (Fox, 2010), not just with an open mind, but also with an inquisitive one. Gasland presents an up-and-close narrative on the surmised ramifications of hydraulic fracturing, “fracking,” and how this well-stimulation technology negatively affects America’s habitat. Lauded by film critics, Gasland received a nomination in 2011 for Best Documentary Feature by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. That recognition along with its 97% positive rating on Rotten Tomatoes must please the film’s writer/director, Josh Fox, and those who support him.

However, before I enthusiastically jump on the anti-fracking bandwagon, my above-mentioned personal documentary-viewing guidelines require me to pause Continue reading Gasland: Russia and Others Promote the Runaway Bandwagon

Charlie Wilson’s War: Main Characters and Misleading Propaganda

When presented with the original script of Charlie Wilson’s War (Nichols, 2007), Texas bon vivant Joanne King Herring (played by Julia Roberts in the movie) keeled over and nearly choked, for the last scene was a video clip of the Pentagon burning on September 11, 2001. What was the cause of her extreme reaction? Outrage over potential misleading propaganda? Continue reading Charlie Wilson’s War: Main Characters and Misleading Propaganda

Their Finest: Lissa Evans Celebrates Ealing Studios’ Propaganda Filmmaker

Ordinary people are capable of the extraordinary. British author Lissa Evans believed that with her heart and soul and set out to prove it by creating her own piece of greatness. The road to achievement is often paved with books; and Lissa, an avid reader, navigated her own course.

Evan’s book, The Finest Hour and a Half, from which this month’s movie is adapted, puts the reader in London as the winds of war are howling from Germany. All cinemas are closed in 1939 as Londoners brace themselves for an onslaught of attacks from across the Channel. Continue reading Their Finest: Lissa Evans Celebrates Ealing Studios’ Propaganda Filmmaker

Leni Riefenstahl: Major Contributor to Film History–Can We Forgive Her?

Let’s say, just for fun, that the history of film is one big party. Each guest brings a gift to the guest of honor—film in this instance—and helps it to grow in technology and influence. Among the earlier “guests” who had arrived in the 1920’s was Sergei Eisenstein, who contributed Montage. If you remember from our articles on Eisenstein, montage is a film editing technique in which a series of images are edited into a sequence that employs the Kuleshov effect. Continue reading Leni Riefenstahl: Major Contributor to Film History–Can We Forgive Her?

The Art of Enron

Most people can bear adversity; but if you wish to know what a man really is give him power. This is the supreme test.—Robert G. Ingersoll

Unless you happened to work at Vermont’s Ben and Jerry’s in 1985 when the 5 to 1 rule¹ was in effect, America’s corporations, unwittingly or not, promoted a type of culture that is “dog eat dog.” Under such merit-based systems, ambitious employees clock in long hours and rely on a variety of skills to climb the competitive corporate ladder to the highest tier of company leadership, where the best fruits of labor can be enjoyed.

Enron executives took this culture model and its fruits to an unprecedented level. For them, the culture wasn’t confined to activities in Enron’s trading floors and accounting offices; for this precious few, it became a way of life in which nothing was ever enough. Continue reading The Art of Enron

12 Angry Men vs “The Trial of the Century”

So impactful was Reginald Rose’s Twelve Angry Men that it ignited Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s passion for law (Semple, 2010; Vergel, 2010). Multiply adapted from Rose’s 1954 teleplay, director Sidney Lumet’s film version was released in 1957 and is recognized today by IMDb as one of the top ten films of all time. It even received the laudable honor of being parodied by “The Simpsons” in 1994, which is akin to winning the most prestigious of awards (FlimSpringfield, 2016).

Continue reading 12 Angry Men vs “The Trial of the Century”